Chicken Wing Gyouza

I’ve been meaning to make Chicken Wing Gyouza for many years, but never quite gotten around to it, on account of the fact that it seems like a lot of effort to de-bone so many chicken wings (because it’d just be ridiculous to only make a small amount!)

Well, I finally got around to it, and it turned out it wasn’t all that time consuming. I started with a tray of chicken wings (about 1.5 kilograms). Taking a paring knife and cutting around the shoulder joint of the wing, I separated the meat from the end of the upper arm bone (or the chickeny equivalent); mostly getting the knife underneath the tendons and flesh and cutting up, out of the meat, towards me, working my way around the bone.

Once I had the end done, I cut down along the side of the bone (sliding my knife in between the flesh and the bone). Once I had separated the flesh from the bone all the way down to the other end, it was a simple matter of dislocating the elbow (or the chickeny equivalent) and wrenching out the bone.

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At this point I decided not to remove the bones from the lower part of the wing. I made this decision for two reasons:

  1. this would leave a convenient boney bit to hold onto when eating the chicken wing gyouza
  2. this would save me a lot of time

I prepared a fairly standard gyouza filling mixture:

  • 250g pork mince
  • equivalent volume of finely diced cabbage
  • 2 tsp minced garlic
  • a bit of soy (didn’t measure. enough to make it smell and look right. maybe 2 tsp?)
  • 1 tsp sesame oil

I then stuffed the mixture into the cavity left by the bone (after I created some more space lower down in the wing by using my finger to separate the layers of skin in the wing). I sealed the opening by folding the skin over the opening and pinning down with a nice bamboo skewer that we brought back from japan (a long way to bring some skewers, but a pack of hundreds only cost us several hundred yen, and they cost about 10 times that here in Australia, for some reason).

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I’ll post some photos of the cooked product once we’ve cooked them up. It’s going to be delicious!

Closing note: One thing that annoys me (so very, very much) is the constant pluralisation and mispronunciation of “gyouza” that I have to deal with from people who obviously didn’t do japanese at school. The plural of gyouza is “gyouza”, not “gyouzas”. You get this a lot with japanese words. and it’s pronounced “gyo-za”, not “gai-yoh-za”. Christ people, come on.

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